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The Liskov Substitution Principle Robert C. Martin

The Liskov Substitution Principle

Robert C. Martin

Published January 20th 2011
ISBN :
ebook
11 pages
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 About the Book 

This is the second of my Engineering Notebook columns for The C++ Report. The articles that will appear in this column will focus on the use of C++ and OOD, and will address issues of software engineering. I will strive for articles that areMoreThis is the second of my Engineering Notebook columns for The C++ Report. The articles that will appear in this column will focus on the use of C++ and OOD, and will address issues of software engineering. I will strive for articles that are pragmatic and directly useful to the software engineer in the trenches. In these articles I will make use of Boochs and Rumbaughs new unified notation (Version 0.8) for documenting object oriented designs. The sidebar provides a brief lexicon of this notation.My last column (Jan, 96) talked about the Open-Closed principle. This principle is the foundation for building code that is maintainable and reusable. It states that well designed code can be extended without modification- that in a well designed program new features are added by adding new code, rather than by changing old, already working, code.The primary mechanisms behind the Open-Closed principle are abstraction and polymorphism. In statically typed languages like C++, one of the key mechanisms that supports abstraction and polymorphism is inheritance. It is by using inheritance that we can create derived classes that conform to the abstract polymorphic interfaces defined by pure virtual functions in abstract base classes.What are the design rules that govern this particular use of inheritance? What are the characteristics of the best inheritance hierarchies? What are the traps that will cause us to create hierarchies that do not conform to the Open-Closed principle? These are the questions that this article will address.FUNCTIONS THAT USE POINTERS OR REFERENCES TO BASE CLASSES MUST BE ABLE TO USE OBJECTS OF DERIVED CLASSES WITHOUT KNOWING IT.